Full TGIF Record # 251
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Web URL(s):http://archive.lib.msu.edu/tic/monos/ABCTurf1928.pdf
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http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=coo.31924014464667
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Material Type:Book
Monographic Author(s):Noer, O. J.
Author Affiliation:Graduate, University of Wisconsin, Division of Soils
Monograph Title:The ABC of Turf Culture, 1928.
# of Pages:95
Publishing Information:Cleveland, Ohio: The National Greenkeeper, Inc.
Collation:95 pp.
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Cultural methods; Fertilization; Nutrients; Fertilizers; Growth regulators; Soils; Water; Organic matter; Acidity; Lime; Golf greens; Golf fairways
Dutch Turfgrass Research Foundation Keywords: 208-C; 502-C; Golf courses; Soil physics; Soil acidity; Fertilizer application; Monograph
Abstract/Contents:Includes: Factors Affecting Turf Growth (Air Temperatures Vary Greatly; How Plants Use Water; Leaves Manufacture Food; Fertile vs. Infertile Soil; Bacteria in the Soil; and Factors Adverse to Turf Growth); Effect of Size and Arrangement of Soil Particles on Turf Growth (Size of Soil Particles Determine Texture; Sand; Clay; Relative Size of Grains of Different Classes; Soils Grouped into Classes Based on Texture; Sands (Usually Poor Turf Soils); Loams (Generally Good Turf Soils); How Soil Texture Can Be Modified; Soil Structure Depends Upon Arrangement of Soil Particles; Spaces Between Soil Particles (Ideal Arrangement of Spherical Soil Particles); Soils Contain Enormous Amount of Internal Surfaces; Best Soils Have Granular Structure; and Turf Improves Soil Structure); The Part Water Plays in the Growth of Turf (Functions of Water; Amount and Kinds of Water in the Soil; Movement of Water in the Soil; Movement of Capillary Water Important; and Maintain Soil Conditions Which Favor the Retention and Rise of Capillary Water); The Functions of Organic Matter in the Soil (Decay of Organic Matter Produces Humus; Humus Main Source of Nitrogen; How Nitrogen of Humus is Made Available; Factors Affecting Decomposition of Humus; Humus Helps Soil Withstand Drought and Holds Plant Food; Humus Modifies Soil Texture; and Methods of Increasing Humus in Soil); Soil Composition and How Plant Food Becomes Available (Soil Deficiencies Usually Confined to Three Plant Food Elements; Total Amount of Plant Food Elements in Various Soils; Amounts of Soluble Plant Food in Soil Solution; How Plant Food Becomes Soluble; Factors Affecting Rate of Solution; and What Constitutes a Fertile Soil?); The Nature of Soil Acidity and Effect of Fertilizer Materials on Soil Reaction (How Soils Become Acid; Methods of Determining Soil Acidity; Effect of Fertilizers on Soil Reaction; Extreme Acidity Associated With Low Fertility; and Acidity at Which Clover Fails); Lime in Sand, Soil, or Water Often Overcomes Acidic Properties of Sulphate of Ammonia (Soils Become Acid Slowly; Lime Often Added to Greens in Sand, Soil or Water; and Rough Test for Lime in Sand and Soil); Essential Plant Food Elements and How Plants Feed (Plant Food Manufactured in Leaf; Plants Require Oxygen; Carbon Cycle in Nature; Essential Mineral Plant Food Elements; and Approximate Composition of Turf Grasses); Elements and Characteristics of Various Groups of Fertilizer Materials (Functions of Specific Plant Food Elements; Sources of Plant Food; Organic Nitrogen; Ammonia Nitrogen; Nitrate Nitrogen; Sources of Phosphoric Acid; and Sources of Potash); Composition and Properties of Individual Fertilizer Materials (Organic Nitrogenous Materials (Manure; Mushroom Soil; Poultry Manure; Sheep Manure; Dried Blood; Cottonseed Meal; Tankage; Sewage Sludges; Tobacco Dust; Raw Bone Meal; Steamed Bone Meal; and Urea); Ammonia Containing Nitrogen Fertilizers (Ammonium Sulphate; and Ammo-Phos); Nitrate Containing Nitrogen Fertilizers (Nitrate of Soda); Phosphoric Acid Containing Fertilizers (Bone Meals; Acid Phosphates; and Basic Slag); and Potash Containing Fertilizer Materials (Muriate of Potash)); and Principles Underlying the Practical Use of Fertilizers on Greens and Fairways (Fertilization of Established Greens; Fertilization of New Greens; Fertilization of Established Fairways; and Fertilization of New Fairway Seedings).
Library of Congress
Subject Headings:
Golf courses; Grasses
Language:English
References:0
See Also:See also the later, totally different but similiarly titled 193x (probably 1938) work, also by Noer, which was a reprint binder of articles from The National Greenkeeper, R=250. R=250

Not to be confused with the much later 1978 work, ABC of Turf Culture, by John Escritt, R=8810. R=8810
Note:Includes "An Introduction" by John Morley, President, National Association of Greenkeepers of America; p. 3
Pictures, b/w
Figures
Tables
Title sometimes reported as: The A B C of Turf Culture
Annotation from Turfgrass History and Literature: Lawns, Sports, and Golf, by James B Beard, Harriet J. Beard and James C Beard:"This is a very rare book that is a must for collectors of historical turfgrass books. The book is devoted specifically to the physical and chemical dimensions of soils and the turfgrass nutritional aspects of golf course turfgrass maintenance in the United States. It was a major contribution in its time. The introduction is by John Morley. There is a photograph of a young O.J. Noer in the front. The chapter subject titles include the following:

I. Factors Affecting Turf Growth
II. Effect of Size and Arrangement of Soil Particles on Turf Growth
III. The Part Water Plays in the Growth of Turf
IV. The Functions of Organic Matter in the Soil
V. Soil Composition and How Plant Food Becomes Available
VI. The Nature of Soil Acidity and Effect on Fertilizer Materials on Soil Reaction
VII. Lime in Sand, Soil, or Water Often Overcomes Acidic Properties of Sulphate in Ammonia
VIII. Essential Plant Food Elements and How Plants Feed
IX. Elements and Characteristics of Various Groups of Fertilizer Materials
X. Composition and Properties of Individual Fertilizer Materials
XI. Principles Underlying the Practical Use of Fertilizers on Greens and Fairways


O.J. articulated his philosophy of nitrogen fertilization of turfgrass in 1928 as follows:

In order to maintain uniform growth the turf must obtain a uniform and continuous supply of nitrogen. It is not feasible to build up large reserves of nitrogen in the soil because of unavoidable losses from leaching and denitrification. This danger exists even with insoluble organic nitrogen, because it is converted into soluble forms by bacteria in the soil, and if the amount formed is larger than the turf roots can take up and utilize, loss occurs. Too much nitrogen tends to produce coarse broad leaves, and a weak succulent turf, particularly if readily available nitrogen is used. Such turf is probably more susceptible to diseases such as brown-patch. All things considered best results are obtained from moderate applications, at frequent intervals, rather than occasional heavy applications. Where good top dressing containing well rotted manure is used very little response is obtained from additional applications of phosphoric acid and potash. Both tend to encourage clover so their use should be based on trials which demonstrate the need for larger amounts than are contained in top dressing mixtures. All carefully conducted tests indicate that sulphate of ammonia encourages the growth of the finer textured grasses, and discourages clover, and nitrate of soda has the opposite effect. Consequently sulphate of ammonia should be chosen as the source of quickly available nitrogen, and used to produce these effects. Ammo-phos is an excellent material where additional phosphoric acid is required. There is also a need for more slowly available nitrogen, to insure a uniform supply. In the past this was supplied by the manure used in compost piles. Near large cities manure is difficult to obtain and many clubs are substituting such materials as cottonseed meal, poultry manure and Milorganite. None of these require long composting and should be mixed with the top dressing just previous to top dressing the green, or they can be spread broadcast over the green and top dressing mixture applied over them. The amount and character of turf growth must be used as a guide in determining the amount of nitrogenous fertilizer to apply. Because of the danger of burning, sulphate of ammonia applications should not exceed three to five pounds per 1000 square feet in the spring and fall, and one to three pounds in the hot summer months. The organic materials can be applied at rates of 15 to 30 pounds per 1000 square feet. The heavier rates are safe during cool weather, and the lighter amounts during the hot summer months. Naturally heavier applications should be made where the turf is poor." p. 299-300
Beard Section Heading:Bibliography of books/monographs on turfgrass culture
Beard Rarity Statement:Very rare
Beard Special Note:Identified by James B Beard in Turfgrass History and Literature: Lawns, Sports, and Golf (2014) as being old and rare based on his experience.
See Also:Other items relating to: Turf books online

Other items relating to: Classic Reads in Turf

Other items relating to: NOER
Quotable quotes"The excellent turf on fairways and greens of certain golf courses is not a matter of chance, but the result of intelligent management on the part of a painstaking greenkeeper, and the club possessing such a greenkeeper is indeed fortunate."
ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Noer, O. J. 1928. The ABC of Turf Culture. 95 pp. Cleveland, Ohio: The National Greenkeeper, Inc.
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Web URL(s):
http://archive.lib.msu.edu/tic/monos/ABCTurf1928.pdf
    Last checked: 10/04/2010
    Requires: PDF Reader
http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=coo.31924014464667
    Last checked: 08/16/2012
    Requires: JavaScript
    Access conditions: Possibly USA access only

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